JOURNAL

Dairy Industry Packaging That Can Extend Shelf Life

By Rachel Murkett April 27th, 2017 |

Keeping food fresh is one of the key concerns of food distributors and suppliers. In the dairy industry, there are general concerns in packaging to keep foods fresh such as water vapor permeability and oxidation and light. A Food and Beverage Project Architect from PreScouter, an R&D research firm, worked with another researcher to present packaging solutions for dairy farmers to keep their food fresh and extend the shelf life of their dairy products.

Key findings included current dairy packaging like clean fill and sealing as well as modified atmosphere packaging (MAP). Different packaging was segmented by types of dairy products such as fluid milk and yogurt as well as butter, cheese, and milk powder. PreScouter concluded this inquiry with suggested next steps.

See the full report below.

At PreScouter, we help Fortune 500 clients quickly get up-to-speed on what they need to know to understand their options. PreScouter’s Inquiry Service is a new, custom approach to ask tailored, science-based questions with a Ph.D. researcher through a brief video call. The results are debriefed in a meeting within two business days. This service provides clients with technically relevant, actionable information to further business objectives on a recurring basis.

Interested in having your inquiry answered? Submit them here.

Rachel Murkett

Rachel Murkett

Rachel is one of PreScouter's Project Architects. She specializes in the food & beverage industry. She completed her PhD in Chemistry at the University of Cambridge. Her research was focused around Photobiology, with research themes including the development of fluorescent proteins for biomedical imaging applications and the formulation of lutein as a nutritional supplement. Prior to her PhD, Rachel completed a Bachelor (Honours) Degree in Biochemistry at the University of East Anglia.
Rachel Murkett

Rachel Murkett

About Rachel Murkett

Rachel is one of PreScouter's Project Architects. She specializes in the food & beverage industry. She completed her PhD in Chemistry at the University of Cambridge. Her research was focused around Photobiology, with research themes including the development of fluorescent proteins for biomedical imaging applications and the formulation of lutein as a nutritional supplement. Prior to her PhD, Rachel completed a Bachelor (Honours) Degree in Biochemistry at the University of East Anglia.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

mautic is open source marketing automation